Antlers on an Airplane?

Live country music at Albuquerque International Sunport.

I’ve flown in and out of Albuquerque International Sunport many times but, on a recent trip, I entered the airport to twangs of live country music. Yeehaw! I thought, “That’s the strangest thing I’ve ever seen at an airport.” I was wrong.

Moose antlers that were shed naturally for sale on the side of road in Maine.

Waiting to board our flight was a man carrying a rack of antlers about 5 feet wide! The tips were outfitted with cut up pieces of hose stuffed with foam. Why? Because antlers are weapons!

It begged a lot of questions.

Passenger: “How did you get them through security?”

Man: “They told me to bring them to the gate.”

Passenger: “Did you buy extra seats?”

Man: “Nope.”

Passenger: “Where will they go on the plane?”

Man: “Dunno.”

Mind you, you can’t bring scissors longer than 4 inches on a plane.

Once boarding started, the ticket agent was apoplectic.

First, he said. “Whoa! Where do you think you’re going?”

Second, “If you read what cannot come on a plane, antlers are on the list.”

To his colleague, “If I see one more pair of antlers today, I’m going home.”

Then the ticket agent made a phone call.

“Calling Security! We have a pair of antlers to check!”

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Maple-Walnut Chicken with Sweet Potato Aioli

Dinner’s ready! Maple Chicken, garlic rice, steamed green beans.

Mix syrup and panko crumbs.

Combine canola oil, Dijon mustard, and thyme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drizzle maple syrup in cutlet pockets.

Brush cutlets with mustard mixture.

 

 

 

 

 

After cutlets are baked, spoon and press on panko paste to form a crust.

Broil cutlets for about 2 minutes, until crust is golden-brown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maple-Walnut Chicken with Sweet Potato Aioli

This chicken recipe in Kosher by Design, Short on Time by Susie Fishbein caught my eye. I should rename it “Maple Chicken” since I made it without walnuts and skipped the sweet potato aioli. Why? Because a) my-picky-eaters-aka-my-daughters don’t like nuts and b) I was really short on time! This recipe was easy and yummy which means next time I make the dish–preparing some cutlets with walnuts, some without, and leaving time for the aioli–it’ll taste even better.

Happy cooking, hon!

Ingredients:

6 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/4 cup plus 2 Tablespoons pure maple syrup (not pancake syrup), divided

fine sea salt

freshly ground black pepper

2 teaspoons canola oil

2 Tablespoons Dijon mustard

1/4 teaspoon dried thyme

1 cup panko bread crumbs

1 1/2 cups canned sweet potatoes, drained

1 1/2 Tablespoons light-brown sugar

2 Tablespoons mayonnaise

1 1/2 Tablespoons pure maple syrup, not pancake syrup

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking pan with parchment paper. Set aside.

2. Lay chicken breasts on a cutting board, and make a cut to form a pocket in each cutlet.

3.  Stuff each pocket with 1 Tablespoon walnuts. Drizzle in 1 teaspoon maple syrup. Close up the pocket. Place pocket-side down on prepared pan. Repeat with remaining breasts. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Combine the canola oil, Dijon mustard, and thyme. Brush each cutlet with this mixture.

4.  Bake for about 18 minutes or until chicken is cooked through.

5. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, mix 1/4 cup maple syrup and panko crumbs to make a paste.

6. After the cutlets are baked, remove from the oven and spoon and press on the panko paste to form a crust. Turn the oven to broil, return the chicken to the oven, and bro 6-8 inches from heat source for 2 minutes, until crust is golden-brown. (Tip: watch cutlets so they don’t burn.)

7. In a small pot, heat the sweet potatoes, smashing them with a fork or spoon. Mix in light -brown sugar. Turn off the heat and whisk in the mayonnaise and 1 1/2 Tablespoons maple syrup.

Serve each cutlet with a dollop of the aioli.

Yield: serves: 6

Source: Kosher by Design, Short on Time

 

Squishy Soft Knit Cowl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn Air

The minute the season turns from summer to fall, I can’t wait to knit new projects. Here’s an “easy, fast cowl that looks more complicated than it is” from Studio June Yarn.

Happy knitting, hon.

Yarn: about 120 yards

Needle: 18″ to 24″ circular, sized to work with yarn

Finished Size: approximately 30 inches in circumference and 6 inches tall

Directions:

  1. Using a long tail cast on, cast on 87 stitches.
  2. Join for working in the round, being careful not to twist your work.
  3. *K4, P4, K4, P4.* Continue in pattern until about 3 yards remain.
  4. Bind off in Purl.

Source: Jill June at Studio June Yarn, studiojuneyarn@sbcglobal.net

Roof Garden Art, The Theater of Disappearance

Stork.

Baby.

A visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the roof. Not only do you get an amazing view of Manhattan, you get to explore changing exhibitions. On view until October 29, 2017 is sculptor Adrián Villar RojasThe Theater of Disappearance, a “performative diorama, where banquet tables occupy an oversize black-and-white checkerboard floor punctuated by sculptures that fuse together human figures and artifacts found within the museum. The resulting juxtapositions put forth a radical reinterpretation of museum practices.”

Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas has transformed the Cantor Roof with an intricate site-specific installation that uses the Museum itself as its raw material. Featuring detailed replicas of nearly 100 objects from The Met collection, The Theater of Disappearance encompasses thousands of years of artistic production over several continents and cultures, and fuses them with facsimiles of contemporary human figures as well as furniture, animals, cutlery, and food. Each object—whether a 1,000-year-old decorative plate or a human hand—is rendered in the same black or white material and coated in a thin layer of dust.

The artist has reconfigured the environment of the Cantor Roof by adding a new pergola, a grand tiled floor, a bar, public benches and augmented planting throughout the space. The Met’s own alphabet has even been incorporated into the graphic identity of the project. To realize this extensive work, the artist immersed himself in the Museum and its staff for many months, holding conversations with the curators, conservators, managers, and technicians across every department who contributed to the realization of this installation.

Hidden woman.

Traveler.

Kissing couple.

Man with eels and rock.

Masked man.

In honor of my love of art, and especially Impressionists, check out new Edgar Degas exhibits on Artsy. In addition to Degas’s bio, over 200 of his works, and exclusive articles, you’ll find up-to-date Degas exhibition listings such as The National Gallery in London exhibit Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell, and an upcoming show at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Related post: Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty

Happy viewing, hon.

Epitaph-Repost

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Today is a year since my mom passed, so I’m sharing these beautiful quotes in her memory.

“…we should be remembered for the things we do. The things we do are the most important things of all. They are more important than what we say or what we look like. The things we do outlast our mortality. The things we do are like monuments that people build to honour heroes after they’ve died. They’re like the pyramids that the Egyptians built to honour the Pharaohs. Only instead of being made out of stone, they’re made out of the memories people have of you. That’s why your deeds are like your monuments. Built with memories instead of with stone.”
― R.J. Palacio

“It has been said, ‘time heals all wounds.’ I do not agree. The wounds remain. In time, the mind, protecting its sanity, covers them with scar tissue and the pain lessens. But it is never gone.”
― Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy

“Silently, one by one, in the infinite meadows of heaven,
Blossomed the lovely stars, the forget-me-nots of the angels.”
― Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie

I wear a veil of sadness. My mother’s illness and passing has left me unmoored, so please bear with me as I stand in an ocean, the waves lapping and tugging, lapping and tugging.

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Epitaph by Merrit Malloy

When I die

Give what’s left of me away

To children

And old men that wait to die.

 

And if you need to cry,

Cry for your brother

Walking the street beside you.

And when you need me,

Put your arms

Around anyone

And give them

What you need to give to me.

 

I want to leave you something,

Something better

Than words

Or sounds.

 

Look for me

In the people I’ve known

Or loved,

And if you cannot give me away,

At least let me live on in your eyes

And not your mind.

 

You can love me most

By letting

Hands touch hands,

By letting bodies touch bodies,

And by letting go

Of children

That need to be free.

 

Love doesn’t die,

People do.

So, when all that’s left of me

Is love,

Give me away.

Birthday Girl-Repost

My mom and third granddaughter.

My mom and third granddaughter.

Today would have been my mom’s 76th birthday. I’m re-posting this, along with an introspective quote, in her memory. 

“The time is ripe for looking back over the day, the week, the year, and trying to figure out where we have come from and where we are going to, for sifting through the things we have done and the things we have left undone for a clue to who we are and who, for better or worse, we are becoming. But again and again we avoid the long thoughts….We cling to the present out of wariness of the past. And why not, after all? We get confused. We need such escape as we can find. But there is a deeper need yet, I think, and that is the need—not all the time, surely, but from time to time—to enter that still room within us all where the past lives on as a part of the present, where the dead are alive again, where we are most alive ourselves to turnings and to where our journeys have brought us. The name of the room is Remember—the room where with patience, with charity, with quietness of heart, we remember consciously to remember the lives we have lived.”

― Frederick Buechner, A Room Called Remember: Uncollected Pieces

Blueberry Buckle

Blueberry Buckle.

Cream butter, sugar and egg.

Add dry ingredient to butter mixture.

 

 

 

 

 

Fold in blueberries.

Sprinkle topping on top, pressing into batter in 3-4 places.

 

 

 

 

Ready for the oven.

Ready to eat.

Two adorable little girls.

Two beautiful teenagers. Friends since 1st grade.

Blueberry Buckle

In lots of my cookbooks, stories accompany recipes. A recipe might be passed down, a family favorite, or bring up a funny memory. This Blueberry Buckle comes with a story, too. I had just turned to the recipe in my daughter’s elementary school cookbook when my daughter’s friend said, “That’s my mom’s recipe!” And so it is. Now, every time I make this not-too-sweet-but-deliciously-tart Buckle, I will think of the two adorable little girls who have grown into beautiful teenagers right before my eyes.

Shout out to Wendy Nubel for the recipe and Linda Eagle for putting the Wyoming Wild Cooks Cookbook together.

Happy baking, hon.

Ingredients Cake:

2 cups sifted all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, room temperature (I used margarine.)

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 large egg

1/2 cup low-fat (2%) milk (I used almond milk.)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries, thawed and drained

Ingredients Topping:

1/2 cup sugar

1/4 cup sifted all-purpose flour

1/3 cup quick-cooking oats

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, room temperature (I used margarine.)

Directions:

1.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter and flour a 10-inch round springform pan or a deep-dish pie pan.

2.  In a small bowl, sift flour, baking powder and salt.

3. In a medium bowl, cream butter, sugar and egg with an electric mixer. Add milk and vanilla, then beat until light yellow and fluffy. Stir in flour mixture, then carefully fold blueberries and spread in pan.

4. In a small bowl, mix topping ingredients with fingers until blended, then sprinkle on top of batter. Press your fingers about half-way down into batter in 3 or 4 places until batter looks bumpy.

5. Bake for 40 minutes or until golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with moist, but not wet, crumbs. It can be served warm right from the pan. Heads up: it took longer to bake, which may be a result of my substitutions.

Fairy Trail Finale

Fairy House Architect

Want to know who’s behind the little bit of magic in the South Mountain Reservation?

Therese Ojibway took to the woods years ago when her son, Clinton, who is now 25, was 3. He has autism, and the nature reserve has been a place of freedom for him and a retreat for her. Five years ago, Ms. Ojibway, a 60-year-old special education teacher, started building the fairy houses, drawing upon a childhood she said was rich in fairy-tale lore and stories like “Thumbelina” by Hans Christian Andersen, “The Borrowers” by Mary Norton and the Flower Fairies, illustrations by Cicely Mary Barker.

Ms. Ojibway said she was also influenced by the fairy homes on Monhegan Island in Maine. “I started looking at the hollows of the trees and thought, ‘If I were a fairy I would live there,’” she said. Ms. Ojibway says she loves that children have been inspired by her work to make their own creations. Children occasionally leave notes with instructions for the fairies, which Ms. Ojibway sometimes acts on. One child left a shell for her to make into a bed, which she did. Others have left their baby teeth for the tooth fairy. She does upkeep on her little houses about once a week, usually in the evenings with her son.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: New York Times

Related Posts:

Fairy Trail

Fairy Furniture, Part 1

Fairy Furniture, Part 2

Fairy Furniture, Part 2

 More fairy furniture!

Do these picture inspire you? Need a fun kids activity? Click here for instructions on DIY fairy furniture. Click here to learn more about the Fairy Trail in the South Mountain Reservation.

Can you guess which set-up is my favorite?

Outdoor swing.

Another swing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Nook.

Sister fairies must meet in the middle.

Chairs and a mirror furnish this “open-air” fairy house.

The Reading Nook is my favorite fairy furniture!

Fairy Furniture, Part 1

What’s more magical than fairy houses? Fairy furniture!

Indoor fairy furniture was formed using wood, rope, mushrooms, cork, burlap and pebbles. Some of the pieces must have come from old-fashioned doll houses. All of it is oh-so-cute! Click here to learn more about the Fairy Trail in the South Mountain Reservation.

Mushrooms, moss and corks make up this tiny dining set.

There’s room for lots of fairies at this table.

Fairies would have sweet dreams on a burlap bed with cork pillows.

Twigs and rope make a cute canopy bed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out this comfy couch and traditional floor lamp.

A tiny toilette!

 

 

 

 

 

 

My nieces on the Fariy Trail.

Want to learn how to make your own fairy furniture? Click here for a link for some great ideas. Happy creating, hon!