Creepy Cowboys and Other Oddities

Giant arrows and teepees outside a shop in between Durango and Mesa Verde, Colorado.

Giant arrows and teepees outside a shop in between Durango and Mesa Verde, Colorado.

Old West store front.

Old West store front.

Propped up and its not even a movie set.

Propped up and its not even a movie set.

Forget online shopping, catalogs, t.v. and newspaper ads.  Nothing says, “Pull your car over RIGHT NOW and SHOP HERE” than giant arrows and teepees!  Hon, Hubby hates to shop but even he was curious about what we’d find inside.

WARNING:  Do Not Proceed Reading This Post if you are an Animal Activist.  It might be the 2000’s, but the West is still wild and animals skins and taxidermic animals are everywhere you look.

In my last post, Window in the Wild West, I mentioned stopping at the Roadkill Cafe and getting the heebie jeebies in the back room.  I don’t know why going to the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan doesn’t bother me.  Maybe its because the animals have been there so long.  Maybe its because they’re behind glass.  Or maybe because you know what you’re going to see.  Whatever!  Hubby, Tween Daughter and I gaped and gawked…all under the watchful eye of The Sheriff!

 

Buffalo jaw bones.

Buffalo Jaw Bones.

I’m not sure who would buy Buffalo Jaw Bones and what you’d use them for.  The sign says, “The Historical Native American War Clubs.”  Umm, really?  I haven’t read any American history text books that mentioned this but, then again, those text books were probably biased in favor of the Colonists.  So, maybe war clubs were kept out of the mix.

Turtle Shells.

Turtle Shells.

Here’s another head scratcher.  I asked the saleslady what on G-d’s green earth would you use these for and she replied, “Indians used to make rattles out of them.”  That’d be a mighty big rattle for little hands.  Even if they were used for rattles back then, what about now?

Pelts.

Pelts.

Le’s face it, fur is warm (and feathers).  I bet, if you lived in Siberia…or on the North Pole…or in Antarctica…or on some very high mountain in a wooden hut, you’d rather have fur (and a down comforter) than something made of Thermoloft.  Not to knock modern technology (I have many coats made with Thermoloft), but ecology and evolution will outlive and outperform all of us humble humans.

Porcupine.

Porcupine.

Taxidermic wall.

Taxidermic wall.

Consider the next photos sorbet to cleanse your palette.

Not odd.  Pretty rugs and wraps.

Not odd. Pretty woven rugs and wraps.

Beautiful strands of turquoise.

Beautiful strands of turquoise.

Need a lasso?

Need a lasso?

Now for the strangest things we saw. 

Varmint Tails.

Varmint Tails.

Varmint Faces.

Varmint Faces.

I have three questions about the oddities above.  1) What would you do with a Varmint Face?  2)  Unless you’re making a Davy Crockett hat, why would you buy a Tail?  3) Who says “Varmint” besides actors in a shoot-em-up Western movie?

And then there were the Creepy Cowboys.  

The first one sat friendly-like outside a store in Old Town Albuquerque. He was strange but he didn’t scare me silly.

Creepy Cowboy #1.

Creepy Cowboy #1.

Tween Daughter and I came around a corner and realized we were being watched by The Sheriff!

Creepy Cowboy #2.

Creepy Cowboy #2.

I actually said, “Hi.”  When The Sheriff didn’t answer, I figured he was the silent type!

Have you seen strange things in your travels?  I’d love to hear what curiosities and oddities you’ve seen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Window Into the Wild West

Grand Canyon, Arizona

Grand Canyon, Arizona–You can see a thunderstorm in the distance.

Hon, I took so many pictures this summer and last, I could center a whole blog around them.  Here are some of the ones that say Southwest.

I found this collection of bottles set against a rusted tin tub appealing.  Maybe its the composition or color or maybe its because I see the extraordinary in the ordinary!

I don’t know if its the color or composition that drew me to this ad hoc collection of bottles, but I had to stop to take a picture.

I also liked the organic nature of this rock garden.  It's so Southwest.

I also liked the organic nature of this rock garden. The log-legged picnic table and the old pick-up truck, along with the red rock mountains in the background tell a story.

Not only did Roadkill Cafe in Seligman, AZ have "interesting" names for menu items (it's motto is "You kill it, we grill it."), it had a room full of taxidermic animals. After a minute, the heebie jeebies kicked in and I had to get some fresh air. But, their mocha coffee was to-umm-die for.

Not only did Roadkill Cafe in Seligman, AZ have “interesting” names for menu items (it’s motto is “You kill it, we grill it.”), it had a room full of taxidermic animals. After a minute, I had the heebie jeebies and needed fresh air. But, their mocha coffee was to-umm-die for.

Fittingly following the pic for the Roadkill Cafe, is a sign I spotted in a diner window--one that's NOT commonly seen on the East Coast.

Fittingly following the pic for the Roadkill Cafe, is a sign I spotted in a diner window–one that’s NOT commonly seen on the East Coast.

Sign seen in Navajo Nation.  First of all, I DIDN'T see any critters, secondly, Teen Daughter pointed out that some of the critters lists ARE NOT reptiles, and thirdly, who is the management behind this sign?  It was posted on the side of the road next to Navajos selling jewelry and a whole bunch of scrub brush.

Posted on the side of the road in Navajo Nation. First of all, I DIDN’T see any critters (drat!), secondly, Teen Daughter pointed out that some of the critters listed ARE NOT reptiles, and thirdly, WHO is the management?

Jail in the Wild West was no joke!  There was a dirt floor, two wooden benches, one stove sitting in the middle and rifles on the wall.  Yikes!

Jail in the Wild West was no joke! Inside was a dirt floor, one wood-burning stove, two wooden benches and several rifles on the wall. Yikes!  Seligman, AZ

I would not want to get into a shootout with Curly!

I would NOT want to get into a shootout with Curly!

Looks like this Paddy Wagon has been out of commission for awhile.  Imagine being transported to jail in one of these.  Double Yikes!

Looks like this Paddy Wagon has been out of commission for awhile. Imagine being transported to jail in one of these. Everybody would know your business. Double Yikes!

Teen Daughter's behind bars!

Teen Daughter’s behind bars!

Gluten Free Spinach Tomato Cheddar Quiche

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Call me a quiche snob!

I can’t bring myself to buy quiches that have 25 plus ingredients, many of them unpronounceable. Sure, I eat my share of processed food. But why buy something when a) the recipe is easy to follow, b) all the ingredients are familiar, and c) the homemade version is healthy and delicious? Plus, quiches freeze well. I’m always happy to pull one of out of the freezer, add some salad and/or soup and call it a meal.

One of my daughters is gluten free so this was my first attempt at making gluten free pastry dough. It was definitely more work than making regular pastry dough, which is a cinch if you have a food processor. I was surprised how well the gluten free dough held its shape. If you want the recipe for regular pastry dough, click here and you’ll link to a previous post,  Broccoli Cheddar Quiche.

Happy cooking, hon!

Gathering Ingredients

Gathering ingredients.

Dried beans weigh pastry dough down while bakes for 10 minutes.

Dried beans weigh pastry dough down it while bakes for 10 minutes.

Shredded cheddar and steamed spinach.

Shredded cheddar and steamed spinach.

Steamed spinach and chopped tomato.

Steamed spinach and chopped tomato.

 

 

 

 

 

Ready to go in the oven.

Ready to go in the oven.

Gluten Free Spinach Tomato Cheddar Quiche ready to eat.

Gluten Free Spinach Tomato Cheddar Quiche ready to eat.

GLUTEN FREE PASTRY DOUGH (single crust)

Ingredients:

1 3/4 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting

1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 stick butter, plus extra for greasing

1 egg, beaten

1/4 cup water

pie weights or dried beans (I bought a bag of navy beans, these can be used again after weighing down dough in oven.)

Directions:

1.  Grease a deep 9-inch tart or pie pan.

2.  To make pastry dough, place the flour, xanthan gum, and salt into a bowl. Add the butter and rub in with your fingertips until it resembles fine bread crumbs.

3.  Make a well in the center of the mixture and add the egg and a little water. Using your hands, mix in the dry ingredients to form a dough. Invert it onto a gluten free floured surface and knead well. Wrap it in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 20-30 minutes.

4.  Roll out the dough and use it to line the prepared tart pan. Place in the freezer for 20 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

5.  Remove the dough from the freezer, line with parchment paper, fill with pie weights or dried beans, and bake in preheated oven for 10 minutes. Remove parchment paper and weights and let the pastry cool slightly before adding filling.

SPINACH TOMATO CHEDDAR QUICHE FILLING

Ingredients:

10 oz. shredded Cheddar cheese

2 Tbsp. flour

1 (10 oz.) pkg frozen spinach, steamed

1 medium tomato, cut into chunks

3 eggs, beaten

¼ to ½ cup half & half or a little milk

Dash of pepper and dash or two of nutmeg

Directions:

1.  In a large bowl, toss cheese and flour together.

2.  Cook spinach according to directions; drain well.

3.  Add spinach and tomato to cheese.  Add eggs to spinach/tomato/cheese mixture.  Add half & half (or milk).  Add pepper and nutmeg; stir.  Mix well.

4.  Pour into piecrust.  Sprinkle nutmeg on top.

5.  Bake 45 to 50 minutes until golden brown.  (Hint: If crust is browning and middle of quiche isn’t set, use a pie rim cover or tin foil to cover perimeter of crust until quiche is done.)

Serves 6 to 8.

*Source for gluten free pastry dough:  Gluten Free Baking by Michael McCamley

Emeralds and Angels, Hiking in Zion (Part 2)

Stunning Striations.

Stunning Striations, Zion, Utah.

If you read Emeralds and Angels, Hiking in Zion (Part 1), you’ll know Hubby was not thrilled (umm, extremely nervous), about hiking Angel’s Landing.

For good reason.

It wasn’t the extremely steep 5-6 hour hike with tons of switchbacks that made his heart race, it was the hike at the top of the mountain, on narrow ridges with deep chasms. Did I mention that you get across the most narrow parts by holding onto a chain anchored into the sandstone?

Guess what I found out?  THERE ARE BREAKS IN THE CHAIN!

Wind and water have carved interesting designs as well as caves into the rock.

Wind and water have carved interesting designs as well as caves into the rock.

We warmed up by hiking Emerald Pools. Our guide then led us to the bottom of the Angel’s Landing where we started the steep ascension in full sun. Technically, the trail is called the West Rim Trail until it meets Angel’s Landing.  Hiking along, we suddenly reached the aptly named Refrigerator Canyon, a mile-long shady part of the trail. We cooled off in time to sweat again, climbing Walter’s Wiggles, “steep 21 sharp zig-zags” that lead to Scout Lookout.

"Walter's Wiggles was named after the first superintendent of Zion who helped engineer the steep zigzagging section."

“Walter’s Wiggles was named after the first superintendent of Zion who helped engineer the steep zigzagging section.”

Hubby and Teen Daughter hiking the "Wiggles."

Hubby and Teen Daughter hiking the “Wiggles.”

Hubby and Teen Daughter decided to rest on Scout’s Lookout while our guide James and I continued on. Here’s the thing. It was crowded. Walking on sandstone is slippery, the ground is gritty and the slopes are smooth. It’s hard to get traction or know where to put your foot as you climb up. I didn’t want to let go of the chain (when there was one), and people were climbing down as we were climbing up.

“I’m not letting go of the chain, so you’ll have to place your hands on either side of me and go around me,” I said.

“You come down, then I’ll go up,” I said.

“We’re doing the ‘chain dance’,” I said.

When there were breaks in the chain and we had to “Spiderman Scramble” up the mountain, I told James, “If I had a bucket list, this would officially be off of it!”

There was a point on the one-way trail where it was so crowded, we would have had to wait to keep going. I said I was “just fine” ending our hike there.  James was, too. He said it but we both felt it.

“EXHILARATED!’

Gorgeous view above Scout's Landing but not as far as the peak of Angel's Landing.

Gorgeous view above Scout’s Landing but not as far as the peak of Angel’s Landing.

View to the peak.  Total elevation 5,785 feet. Hike elevation gain 1,488.

View of the trail leading to  the peak. In 1916 while exploring Zion, Frederick Fisher said, “Only an angel could land on it,” giving the trail its name.  Total elevation 5,785 feet. Hike elevation gain 1,488.

I was "just fine" ending out hike here!

I was “just fine” ending our hike here!

Looking down on the West Rim Trail.

Looking down on the West Rim Trail.

Not only were we all exhilarated (except for Teen Daughter, who was out of breath!), we were ready for our next adventure. If I go back to Zion one day, I’ll wave to the Angels landing on the top of that trail.

Then, I’ll gear up and head for the canyons!

(Canyoneering in Zion Harnesses, Helmets & Hooks Part 1 and Quicksand and Teamwork Part 2)

 

sources:  Zion Outfitter, Zion National-Park.com

Emeralds and Angels, Hiking in Zion (Part 1)

Zion National Park, Utah

Zion National Park, Utah

Researching Zion, I came up with an itinerary. In the morning, we would hike the Narrows and, in the afternoon, we’d go canyoneering.

Hiking the Narrows means hiking in water through slotted canyons. Even though large rocks line the bottom of the river, we’d be dressed properly, carry tall walking sticks, and be guided by an experienced hiker. We picked up our waterproof boots and Neoprene socks at Zion Outfitter the day before, so we’d be ready to roll at 7am the next day.

One problem. It rained overnight. A lot.

The Parks Service closed the Narrows because the water level was too high. The usually clear, shallow water was now brown, swirling, strong, and deep. Even if the Park Service opened up the Narrows later, which it did, we had to make a decision. We decided to hike Emerald Pools and Angels Landing.

One more problem. Back at home, when I showed Hubby a video of hikers on Angel’s Landing, his breathing turned rapid. “What’s wrong?” I asked. “It’s just a video.” “I have no interest in hiking that!” he replied. Yet, there we were.  With Plan A shelved, it was time for Plan B.

Look what we saw on the trail.

Look what we saw on the trail.

Here's another one.

Here’s another one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerald Pools waterfall.

Emerald Pools waterfall.

Blue sky and cascading water mesmerize.

Blue sky and cascading water mesmerize. Hubby took these Emerald Pools photos.

Our guide told us that some people rappel from top of the waterfalls!

Our guide told us that some people rappel from the top of the waterfalls!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hubby and Teen Daughter.

Hubby and Teen Daughter.

Hiking Emerald Pools was a great warm-up for the day. Our guide, James Milligan, led us to the lower and upper pools, then we hiked from the pools to the start of Angel’s Landing.

It wasn’t necessary to have a guide for the morning hikes but 1) we’d already hired him, 2) he knows the mountain so well that he efficiently led us from trail to trail (otherwise, we might still be consulting our map, wondering where to go!), 3) James could answer our many questions, and 4) having a guide gave Hubby assurance that he could hike however much–or little-of Angel’s Landing he was comfortable with!

Immense red rocks balance on top of each other.

Immense red rocks balance on top of each other.

Stay tuned for Part 2.

Have you been to Zion? Have you hiked the Narrows? Emerald Pools?  Angels Landing?

Hon, I’d love to hear from you.

Sources:  Zion OutfitterZion National-Park.com, Joe’s Guide To Zion National Park

My Top 20 Triplets Memories

Two months old.

Two months old.

Happy 20th birthday today to our three beautiful babies!

Here are my Top 20 memories of raising two girls and a boy, born within five minutes of each other.

The triplet stroller turned heads.

The triplet stroller turned heads.

1.  Walking up and down our street to get some fresh air. (“Sleep babies, sleep!”)

2.  Watching all three babies nap in one crib, swaddled and warm. (bundled like sausages)

3.  Reading stories together, either at bedtime or on long car trips. (Except when they wanted to read out loud and were at three different reading levels.  Oh, the competition!)

Triplets plus one.

Triplets plus one.

4.  Pumpkin picking, wagon rides, and bringing home cider, doughnuts and apple butter. (looking for those perfect pumpkins)

Halloween.

Halloween.

5.  Halloween–dressing up, trick-or-treating, pumpkin carving, and the elementary school show. (Our attic doubles as a Halloween costume shop!)

6.  Thanksgiving along with many holidays spent with family. (cleaning up, cooking, celebrating and catching up)

7.  Countless trips to Baltimore (shout out to my MD family) and Long Island (Dad’s family).

Train ride to NYC.

Train ride to NYC.

8.  Day trips, especially taking the train to Manhattan. (One of my many mottos:  “Getting there is the accomplishment.  Being there is icing on the cake.”)

Scan 12

9.  Building snowmen, sledding and playing in the snow. (Hot chocolate and cookies, anyone?)

First day of high school.

First day of high school.

10.  First day of school. (School supplies? The right outfit? Ready to go.)

11.  First day of camp (and first time on a big, yellow school bus)

Farm-themed b-day party.

Farm-themed b-day party.

12.  Birthday parties.  (Hon, you know I love a party!)

Skiing.

Skiing.

13.  Skiing. (Almost nothing beats a sunny day skiing.)

14.  Trip to Israel. (I knew the trip was a success when we landed in the US and my son asked, “When can we go back?”)

15.  Vacations, especially Disney World. (The secret to theme park success:  pack snacks and sandwiches.)

16. Significant religious milestones. (connecting roots from one generation to the next)

Bethany Beach, Delaware.

Bethany Beach, Delaware.

17.  Beach vacations and day trips to the Maryland, Delaware and Jersey shores.(sandcastles, sunbathing and seashell collecting)

"Baby A"

“Baby A”

Scan 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18.  Watching our determined 2 pound 9 ounce daughter grow up.

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"Baby B"

“Baby B”

Scan

 

 

 

 

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19.  Watching our feisty 4 pound 12 ounce son turn into a young man.

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"Baby C"

“Baby C”

Scan 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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20.  Watching our sassy 4 pound 4 ounce daughter morph before our eyes.

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Hon, I’m raising a virtual glass of champagne in a toast to my three 20 year-olds.  Health and happiness.

Cheers!

Citrusy and Sweet Orange Muffins

Citrus Muffins

Citrus Muffins

I recently baked Orange Muffins using my new Orange Cake Recipe. They tasted good, but I wanted to increase the citrus flavor and add some sweetness. I figured a bit of lemon and a touch of chocolate would do the trick.

Here’s the Orange Cake Recipe with a few additions. The Citrusy and Sweet Orange Muffins are in the oven now. Can you smell them?

Happy baking, hon!

1. Beat butter and granulated sugar until fluffy. Beat in eggs.

1. Beat butter and granulated sugar until fluffy. Beat in eggs.

2. Peel, cut into chunks and seed oranges.

2. Peel, cut into chunks and seed oranges.

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3. After whirling oranges in food processor, add them to butter/sugar batter and beat until blended.

3. After whirling oranges in food processor, add them to butter/sugar batter and beat until blended.

Add 2 Tablespoons of orange juice, 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, and 1/2 teaspoon of lemon extract.

4. Add 2 Tablespoons of orange juice, 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, and 1/2 teaspoon of lemon extract.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4. Add flour, salt, baking soda and baking powder to bowl and beat until smooth.

5. Add flour, salt, baking soda and baking powder to bowl.

6. Beat batter until smooth.

6. Beat batter until smooth.

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7. Drizzle a bit of chocolate syrup into center of muffin cups.

7. Drizzle a bit of chocolate syrup into center of muffin cups.

8. Spread chocolate syrup into a star shape with a toothpick. Add more batter on top of chocolate before baking.

8. Spread chocolate syrup into a star shape with a toothpick. Add more batter on top of chocolate before baking.

 

 

 

 

 

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9. After baking, let muffins cool slightly before glazing.

9. After baking, let muffins cool slightly before glazing.

10. Drizzle glaze over inverted, slightly cooled cake. Let glazed cake set before serving.

10. Drizzle glaze over muffins and let set.

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Enjoy!

Enjoy!

IMG_5395

 

 

 

 

 

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Citrusy and Sweet Orange Muffins

Ingredients:

1 cup butter, softened (or margarine to make the muffins non-dairy)

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar

3 large eggs

2 oranges (about 1 lb total), ends trimmed, then cut into chunks and seeded

1 Tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon orange juice

1/2 teaspoon lemon extract

Chocolate syrup to drizzle

2 1/2 cups flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar (confectioner’s sugar)

2 Tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon lemon juice

non-stick cooking-oil spray

Directions:

1.  Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.  Line muffin tray with baking cups or coat tray with non-stick cooking spray.

2.  In a large bowl, use a mixer on medium speed to beat butter and granulated sugar until fluffy.  Beat in eggs.

3.  Whirl orange chunks in a food processor until mostly smooth but not pureed.

4.  Add 1 1/2 cups orange mixture to butter/ sugar batter and beat until blended.

5.  Add lemon juice, lemon extract and 1 teaspoon orange juice.

6.  Add flour, salt, baking soda, and baking powder to batter and beat until smooth.

7.  Fill muffin cups half-way with batter.  Drizzle a dot of chocolate syrup in the middle of batter. Using a toothpick, spread chocolate in a star shape. Add batter on top of each half-way filled muffin cup.

8.  Bake approximately 25-30 minutes until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with only a few crumbs clinging to it.  Cool pan on a cooling rack.  (I used the extra batter to make a small loaf. That took approx. 40 mins to bake.)

9.  In a small bowl, whisk together powdered (confectioner’s) sugar, 2 Tbls orange juice and 1 tsp lemon juice.  Drizzle over muffins and let glaze set.

Yield:  Depends on if you want all muffins or a muffin/ loaf combo. With the measurements above, I made 12 muffins and 1 small loaf, in a 7″ length x 2.5″ width x 1.8″ high oven-safe paper bakeware “baking pan.” (brand: Welcome Home, purchased at: Homegoods).

Canyoneering in Utah, Quicksand and Teamwork (Part 2)

Mt. Carmel, Utah

Mt. Carmel, right outside Zion National Park, Utah

“Is there really such a thing as quicksand?”

In my last post, Canyoneering in Utah, Harnesses, Helmets & Hooks (Part 1), Hubby, Teen Daughter and I got geared up. We hiked to the top of the canyons, listened closely as James Milligan, our Zion Outfitters guide, taught us how to rappel on vertical sandstone, and learned that friction is our friend.

Tip:  “Lower you butt until it’s in line with your feet, then ‘walk’ down the canyon.”

James informed us that the bottom of the canyons had been dry for the past four years, but it had flooded in April as well as rained the night before. We were going to have to jump into water. How deep was the water? Not sure. What was at the bottom of the water? Quicksand!

Ropes in the canyon.

Ropes in the canyon.

We rappelled down this canyon

We rappelled down this canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intense hiking.

Intense hiking.

Narrow canyon walls.

Narrow canyon walls.

Hubby rappelled first, then belayed Teen Daughter, me and James. When there was just a pool of (cold) water at the canyon bottom, Hubby would let us know where is seemed shallowest. Then we’d jump in and scramble to flat ground. Teamwork was essential!

James guessed (right) that there was quicksand at the bottom of one pool. I’d doubted if quicksand really existed. Hon, quicksand is real! Hubby went down first, hoisted himself out of the goop and made it to flat ground. Whew! He held the rope below while James held it above, creating a taut line for me and Teen Daughter to grab onto and, hand-over-hand, get us out of the muck. But the muck pulled me in!

Want to know what panic feels like?  It feels like quicksand sucking you in, drawing you deeper as you try to kick your way out. Help!

I used all of my upper body strength to pull up on that taut rope.  I hollered for Hubby to grab my arm and GET ME THE HECK OUT OF THERE!

Once we were all out, the feeling was fabulous.  WE DID IT!

The setting sun made the rocks even redder.

The setting sun made the rocks even redder.

 

Huge birds' nest in the crags.

Huge birds’ nest in the crags.

 

 

 

 

 

Looking back and up.

Looking back and up.

What a day!

We weren't done yet. We crawled like Spiderman up a sandstone face to reach our car.

This pic was overexposed, but I adjusted it as much as possible.  Not on flat ground yet!

The only way back was up!

A fallen tree blocked the less steep path back to the car, so we had to change plans. “Huh?” I asked. “We’re going straight up?” Thank goodness James knew what to do. When we couldn’t find a foothold, he placed his foot sideways so we could brace against it like a step! We “Spidermanned” our way up the sandstone (which, I learned the hard way, you can’t grasp like rock because petrified sand dunes crumble when you grab them) and finally reached the car…Gritty. Dirty. Wet. Sooo happy!

When can I go again?

(Want to comment?  Click on the Word Bubble next to Title of Post.  Thanks, hon!)