Raku Extruded Bowls

Pieces glow orange when they’ve been Raku fired to about 1,700-1,800 degrees F.

One of my favorite things is to Raku fire with my teacher and potter extraordinaire Peter Syak. In a (small, masked and socially distanced) ceramic class this summer, Peter introduced the extruder, which is like a giant Play-Doh machine, but for clay.

I made seven bowls: three small ones without feet and four large ones with feet. My carving needs a ton of practice, but I like how some of the pieces came out.

Though Raku pottery is generally not food-safe, it’s safe with “dry” food such as candy, nuts, and pretzels.

The Copper Blue Luster glaze is beautiful, and I always like the crackles that show up when using Clear Glaze.

Happy creating, hon!

 

Aqua Lustre

Chesapeake Hyatt Infinity Pool and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Chesapeake Hyatt Infinity Pool and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

Water is in the news.

I planned on posting photographs of water before predictions that Hurricane Joaquin was headed our way. Luckily, it didn’t reach our town and we avoided another Hurricane Sandy situation.

Along with patterns created by the juxtaposition of sky and man-made objects, I love taking pictures of water. Its’ color, translucency or opaqueness, movement and mystery are eternally fascinating.

Aqua water is especially alluring, which is why I love the Aqua Lustre Raku glaze offered at my summer Raku class.

There’s more to come in this Series of Blue (Serene Sky and Metal and Blues).

Hon, thanks for visiting Bmore Energy.

Ceramic plates I glazed with Aqua Lustre.
Raku ceramic plates I glazed with Aqua Lustre.

Ceramic vase and tea box.
Raku ceramic vase and tea box I glazed with Aqua Lustre.

Grotto in Israel
Grotto, Israel

Sandpiper Bay Infinity Pool, Florida
Sandpiper Bay Infinity Pool, Florida

Bar Harbor, Maine
Bar Harbor, Maine.  Check out the hammock.  WHO was planning on sleeping there?