Show-n-Tell, Knit Lantern Blanket

Are you a several-projects-at-a-time or a one-project-til-its-finished person?

I’m in the “several-projects” camp, and usually enjoy having choices, but working on this Lantern Blanket became my sole project from Fall until Spring. Shout out to my friend Ina who shared this pattern by @ Woolture by Sia Nv Estate. I think Ina knits blankets as quickly as I bake a tray of cookies because she has finished many blankets. Hon, this will be the only (and I mean ONLY) full size afghan I work on for a very long time. It took a ton of concentration, mistakes unraveled, rows re-done, and language not suitable for this G-rated blog. But, I did it! I finished this blanket before summer. One big goal accomplished. Whew!

Yarn info: Sueno Worsted HiKoo, 80% Merino Superwash, 20% Viscose from Bamboo, color Manatee

Source: Where else? Wool & Grace

Knit Halter Top

Knit Halter Top

While looking through one of my knitting books, Knitting Pretty by Kris Percival, I came across this quick and easy halter top.  I decided to start right away, but needed yarn that was lightweight and washable. Here’s when–ummm–collecting and keeping odd balls of yarn comes in handy!

I combined a skein of blue and a skein of cream to create heathered fabric. When the blue was running low, I knit a stripe and then finished the top with cream. The pattern calls for an open back, but I wanted somewhat of a bottom in the back. After one failed attempt to knit in rib stitch the whole way around (it was too loose), I added two angled back panels that join with a button. Since the daughter I knit this for is quarantining in CA, I may re-work the back when she returns, removing the button and adding ties instead.

Hon, do you think about these would make cute gifts for my many nieces?

Happy knitting!

Knitting Pretty’s description of the piece–

This cool cotton halter is perfect for those days when it’s just too hot for a T-shirt. Since you will be working with a double strand of yarn in two different colors, the halter knits up quickly and is a unique creation.

Knit Halter Top

Materials:

  • 4 skeins (50 grams each) cotton/acrylic blend worsted weight yarn
  • 1 size 9 circular needle, 24 inches long
  • 1 pair size 7 needles (straight or circular)
  • tape measure
  • scissors
  • yarn needle
  • gauge aid (optional)

Pattern:

  1. Working with a double strand of yarn, make a stockinette stitch swatch with size 9 needles, and check gauge. If it’s not 3 1/2 stitches per inch across, change needle size to match it.
  2. Cast 54 (60) stitches onto the size 9 circular needle. Work in knit 2, purl 2 ribbon until the piece measures 2 (3) inches.
  3. Knit in stockinette stitch for 2 inches. Your entire piece should measuure 4 (5) inches. You will now begin to decrease.
  4. Row 1:  Knit 1, knit 2 together, knit until 3 stitches remain on your needle, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, knit last stitch. Row 2:  Purl. Repeat these two rows 19 times until 16 (20) stitches remain on needles. You will decrease 2 stitches every time you repeat row 1.
  5. Bind off.
  6. Make the 4 halter ties by using size 7 needles to pick up 3 stitches per tie from the edges if the halter. Knit each tie in garter stitch, using a single strand of yarn, until it is 11 inches long (I made the straps 15 inches.)
  7. Weave in and trim loose ends.

Angled back panels.

Pattern photo from book.

Halter top shown in book.

To Add Angled Back Panels: I picked up 2o stitches on each side towards and knit in stockinette stitch, decreasing on every right side until I reached the middle of the back and bound off.

Squishy Oversized Knit Cardigan

Color: “Bells of Ireland”

Juniper Moon Farm, “Bud” is a chunky weight, 100% Organic Peruvian Cotton yarn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of my daughters commented that she liked a friend’s squishy, oversized knit cardigan. What came out of my mouth? “I can make that.” Umm–I hadn’t knit a sweater since college! But there I was, searching online for a similar looking sweater when the actual pattern for the “Downtown Cardigan” by designer Stephanie Lau was featured on loveknitting.

The pattern is too many pages to share in a post, so if you’re interested check it out on loveknitting. ($3 to download) I adjusted the pattern to reduce the sleeve length and width, but the sleeves are still too long and a bit too oversized. If I knit this again, I’ll adjust then even more. Other than that, the pattern was easy to follow and the parts easy to sew together. Lau has a bunch of interesting looking projects.

Since my daughter moved to LA, I thought cotton would be better than wool. At my favorite yarn shop, Wool and Grace, it was hard to decide which color of Juniper Moon Farm’s 100% organic Peruvian cotton to choose from. Bells of Ireland won out!

Happy knitting, hon!

Morgan wearing her new sweater.

 

Light As Air Bias Loop Infinity Scarf

Light as Air Bias Loop Infinity Scarf

What is it about infinity scarves? 

I love knitting infinity scarves and made this one for my cousin’s 25th birthday. This Wool & Grace  pattern is easy but it suggests binding off using kitchener stitch, a stitch I’d never used before. I got the hang of kitchener stitch, a way to bind off that creates an almost invisible seam, by watching a tutorial online (see link below). My advice when binding off this way is to adjust the tension as you go because you don’t want to do it at the end (trust me!). Next time a pattern calls for this bind off method, I’ll be prepared.

Happy knitting, hon.

Light as Air Bias Loop Infinity Scarf

Yarn: 1 skein Madeline Tosh Merino Light (Yarn A) and 2 skeins Rowan Kidsilk Haze (Yarn B) {I used one color for the whole scarf but knit from 2 skeins.}

Needles & Notions: US 10.5 circular needle, Size J Crochet Hook, extra 10.5 straight needle, Darning Needle, Smooth waste yarn

Gauge: approximately 14 stitches/4 inces

Abbreviations: K=knit, P=purl, KFB=Knit into the front and back of the same stitch, RS=Right Side, WS=Wrong Side, STS=Stitches

Instructions: Using crochet hook and waste yarn, chain 86 stitches and fasten off. With knitting needles and two yarns held together, knit into the bumps on the back of the chain 82 times (82 stitches cast on).

Row 1 (RS) K1, KFB, K to last 3 sts, K2tog, K1

Row 2 (WS) Purl

Repeat Rows 1 & 2 until approximately 42″ ending with a purl row. Cut yarn leaving 5 yards for grafting.

Carefully unravel your crochet chain from your provisional cast-on and place stitches on extra needle. Place two ends of the scarf with WS together. Cut yarn leaving tail 24″ long. Join beginning and end to your work and join using kitchener stitch. Click here to watch a video on how to bind off using kitchener stitch. Weave in ends and block as desired.

Source:  Wool & Grace

Knitted Cable Baby Blanket

OMG! Isn’t this the sweetest picture of big sisters with their baby brother?

Knitted Cable Baby Blanket

What to knit when a dear friend is expecting her third child and doesn’t know what she’s having?

I picked up 35 Knitted Baby Blankets for the Nursery, Stroller and Playtime by Laura Strutt at my favorite knitting store Wool & Grace, and chose a pattern for a cream blanket–the color of the crochet edge tbd (to be determined). I hadn’t cabled since college, but it came back quickly. I love how this blanket turned out. New mommy loves it also. Yay!

Darling Baby Boy with his new blanket.

Sources: 35 Knitted Baby Blankets by Laura Strutt, Wool & Grace

Handsome Knit Men’s Scarf

No-Purl Ribbed Scarf
No-Purl Ribbed Scarf.

I used Merino Superwash so this scarf would be easy to wash and dry.
I used Merino Superwash so this scarf would be easy to wash and dry.

Inspiration piece from pattern posted on Ravely.
Inspiration piece shown with the pattern.

Cartridge Belt Rib

Searching for a handsome, masculine scarf, I found this pattern on Ravelry where credit is given to Purl Soho, a gorgeous yarn shop in Manhattan. This purl-less stitch is known as the Cartridge Belt Rib and is considered a classic stitch pattern. Purl Soho says,

This robust rib stitch produces prominent columns of elongated knit stitches separated by broad valleys of dense texture. The juxtaposition is not only fascinating; it’s beautiful too.

Happy knitting, hon.
MATERIALS:

Suggested on pattern–4 (5) skeins of Purl Soho’s Alpaca Pure, 100% alpaca. I used Sueno Worsted by HiKoo’s Merino Superwash, color Evergreen.
US #8 straight or circular needles – 5.0mm

YARDAGE:  436 – 545 yards (399 – 498 m)
GAUGE:  22 stitches = 4 inches in stitch pattern

FINISHED SCARF SIZE:  8 ½ inches wide x 64 (80) inches long

NOTES:

Slip all slipped stitches purl-wise.

This stitch pattern is worked over a multiple of 4 + 3 stitches.

PATTERN
Cast on 47 stitches.

Row 1: K3, *slip 1 wyif (with yarn in front), k3, repeat from * to end of row.

Row 2: K1, *slip 1 wyif, k3, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, slip 1 wyif, k1.

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 until piece measures 64 (80) inches from cast on edge or until desired length, ending with Row 2.

Bind off in a k3, p1 rib. Here’s how… K2, slip the first stitch over, k1, slip the first stitch over, *p1, slip the first stitch over, [k1, slip the first stitch over] 3 times, repeat from * to end of row.

Weave in ends and block as desired.

Source: purlsoho.com