If Beale Street Could Talk, Movie Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes a movie is so beautiful that it stays with me for a very long time. If Beale Street Could Talk , based on the novel by James Baldwin, will be right behind my eyes where I’ll be re-playing the magnetic love story, gorgeous lighting, flashback scenery, devastating accusation, life-long struggles, and incredible inner strength of the characters. See it. Soak it in. Remember it.

Want to watch the trailer? Find out more about the cast? Watch an interview with director Barry Jenkins?

Have you seen the movie, hon? What did you think?

If Beale Street Could Talk is a beautiful, expressive film, at times feeling like a tone poem or lyrical plaint. It’s set in the 1970s, but thanks to the way it confronts how sexual assault allegations, policing, and racism can interlock for communities of color, it feels incredibly contemporary, too. It’s hard not to fall under its beautiful, somber, lustrous spell, and as a story about black American life framed as a love story, its images are indelible.   Alissa Wilkinson for Vox

I left the movie wanting to know more about the characters. Next book I read will be this.

In this honest and stunning novel, James Baldwin has given America a moving story of love in the face of injustice. Told through the eyes of Tish, a nineteen-year-old girl, in love with Fonny, a young sculptor who is the father of her child, Baldwin’s story mixes the sweet and the sad. Tish and Fonny have pledged to get married, but Fonny is falsely accused of a terrible crime and imprisoned. Their families set out to clear his name, and as they face an uncertain future, the young lovers experience a kaleidoscope of emotions-affection, despair, and hope. In a love story that evokes the blues, where passion and sadness are inevitably intertwined, Baldwin has created two characters so alive and profoundly realized that they are unforgettably ingrained in the American psyche.  Goodreads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s